Powered by Leeds Metropolitan University
Business Studies Resources Popular resources on the {my channel} blog Resource tags for the blog RSS Feed for the blog Twitter feed for this blog Teacher Email Resource Newsletter Category listing for this blog

HRM/People Study Note Home | Latest HRM Resources from the tutor2u Blog | HRM/People Revision Quizzes

Motivation Theory - Maslow

Author: Jim Riley  Last updated: Sunday 23 September, 2012

Maslow's hierarchy of needs

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is a "content theory" of motivation" (the other main one is Herzberg's Two Factor Theory).

Maslow's theory consisted of two parts:

(1) The classification of human needs, and

(2) Consideration of how the classes are related to each other

The classes of needs were summarised by Maslow as follows:

Maslows hierarchy of needs

How does the Hierarchy Work?

- A person starts at the bottom of the hierarchy (pyramid) and will initially seek to satisfy basic needs (e.g. food, shelter)

- Once these physiological needs have been satisfied, they are no longer a motivator. the individual moves up to the next level

- Safety needs at work could include physical safety (e.g. protective clothing) as well as protection against unemployment, loss of income through sickness etc)

- Social needs recognise that most people want to belong to a group. These would include the need for love and belonging (e.g. working with colleague who support you at work, teamwork, communication)

- Esteem needs are about being given recognition for a job well done. They reflect the fact that many people seek the esteem and respect of others. A promotion at work might achieve this

- Self-actualisation is about how people think about themselves - this is often measured by the extent of success and/or challenge at work

Maslow's model has great potential appeal in the business world. The message is clear - if management can find out which level each employee has reached, then they can decide on suitable rewards.

Problems with the Maslow Model

There are several problems with the Maslow model when real-life working practice is considered:

- Individual behaviour seems to respond to several needs - not just one

- The same need (e.g. the need to interact socially at work) may cause quite different behaviour in different individuals

- There is a problem in deciding when a level has actually been "satisfied"

- The model ignores the often-observed behaviour of individuals who tolerate low-pay for the promise of future benefits

- There is little empirical evidence to support the model. Some critics suggest that Maslow's model is only really relevant to understanding the behaviour of middle-class workers in the UK and the USA (where Maslow undertook his research).








Add your comments and share this study note:

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Tutor2u support for students
Teaching support and resources
Search for resources on tutor2u

Law



Refine Search by Subject
A Level Economics
Business Studies
Geography Give It A Go!
History Law
IB Diploma Politics
Religious Studies Sociology

Order Search Results By


Follow tutor2u on Twitter
   
   

tutor2u Home Page | Online Store | About tutor2u | Copyright Info | Your Privacy | Terms of Use

tutor2u

Working with Our Partners

 Zondle - Games for LearningVue Cinemas | Moneypenny | Nexcess | Really Simple Systems 

Boston House | 214 High Street | Boston Spa | West Yorkshire | LS23 6AD | Tel +44 0844 800 0085 | Fax +44 01937 529236

Company Registration Number: 04489574 | VAT Reg No 816865400

tutor2u is proud to sponsor TABS Cricket Club and the Wetherby Cricket League as part of its commitment to invest in local junior sport