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Unit 1 Micro: Occupational Mobility from Mines to ..... Mines

Wednesday, June 12, 2013


Miners made redundant from Maltby Colliery in Yorkshire many of whom with decades of experience faced years on the unemployment register when the mine closed earlier in 2013. But some have been thrown a lifeline with the rising demand for miners in the UK potash industry.

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Paul Ormerod: The Rapid Rise of the Food Bank

FOOD banks are a rapidly growing phenomenon in the UK. A few years ago, they barely existed, but an estimated half a million people now make use of them every week. On the face of it, it seems that poverty has sadly become endemic since the financial crisis, with many families unable even to feed themselves. Real incomes have declined since 2007, putting pressure on household budgets. But the pace of increasing demand is surprising.

In fact, the food bank is a market. It is, however, complex – with particular features which mean that it is likely to grow rapidly, exactly as we have seen. The key point is that food is not the only commodity traded.

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Structural unemployment - a real problem that needs addressing NOW!

Sunday, June 02, 2013

Interesting article from the New York Times digging into perhaps the most worrying legacy of this Great Recession, the problem of hysteresis and structural unemployment. It looks at the causes and potential solutions as well as including some great images included below illustrating the concept.

"Unemployment is staying high despite the end of the recession because we are now in a historic transition. Because of automation, globalization, efficiency and other factors, we no longer need the share of people working that we have had in the past. With these trends moving in only one direction, it is clear that the job crisis is permanent and will not go away with better economic times."

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Zero hours contracts and youth employment

Saturday, May 18, 2013


From the employer's point of view, a zero hours contract is a great example of the benefits of the flexible labour market. They allow the employer to change the number of hours an employee works each week, with more shifts offered when they are busy, and fewer when they are not; costs can therefore be controlled and matched more exactly to revenue. Neil Carberry at the CBI says that they have helped to save jobs during the recession and stagnant growth: "It's zero hours contracts and other forms of flexible working that mean there are half a million fewer unemployed people than there might otherwise have been." Now figures from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) show the number of 16 to 24-year-olds on zero hours contracts has more than doubled since the start of the economic downturn, rising from 35,000 in 2008 to 76,000 in 2012. This means that one in every three people on a zero-hours contract is under 25 (- although that proportion doesn't look as if it has changed very dramatically throughout the period shown). If this is good for the employer, how is it for the employee?


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Unit 2 Macro: Does High Home Ownership Cause Unemployment?

Monday, May 13, 2013


For many years Professor Andrew Oswald has researched the links between home ownership levels and labour market performance. This new paper with Professor David Blanchflower takes the debate forward - they argue that rising home ownership can bring about negative externalities for the rest of the economy, damaging labour mobility and curtailing new business start-ups. It is an argument worth looking at when we discover some of the structural causes of joblessness. Read the article here

See also: It's not the deficit that will haunt our children: it's unemployment (Heather Stewart, The Observer, May 2013)

See also: Forget inflation – what hurts the most is unemployment (David Blanchflower, Independent, April 2013)

Analysis of Youth Unemployment

Sunday, May 05, 2013

This two-minute video from The Economist analyses the growing problem of youth unemployment in selected developed economies since the start of the financial crisis in 2007, including Greece, Spain, the UK, France, US and Germany. The chilling statistic from The Economist is that almost a quarter of the world's young people eligible for employment are without a job.

Youth unemployment in the UK

In the period from June to August 2013, 958,000 young people in the UK aged 16-24 were unemployed. The unemployment rate for those aged 16-24 was 21.0%

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UK Economy Revision - Policies to Reduce Unemployment

Friday, May 03, 2013

Here is a streamed (and downloadable) presentation on policies to cut unemployment in the UK economy.

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The Angry Economist 2 - The George Osborne Edition (evaluating macroeconomic policies)

Friday, April 19, 2013

He's back but he's still angry!  In this latest version of The Angry Economist, our favourite curmudgeonly analyst wants to know students' opinion on George Osborne's economic policies - no wonder his blood pressure has risen!

This simple Powerpoint resource is aimed at getting your students to analyse and evaluate economic policies - 8 of the Chancellor's policies are presented and the Angry Economist randomly picks a macro-economic objective to consider.  All you have to do is get 8 volunteers from your class to do the analysing - a great 10 minute activity whilst revising for the up-coming macro exams at either GCSE, AS or A2 level.

Here is a list of the policies the Angry Economist wants students to look at (you may wish to recap on them before you start the activity):

  • Reduce Government debt
  • Increased number of private sector jobs
  • Increased allowance before Income Tax needs to be paid
  • Cut Corporation Tax
  • Set up Regional Growth Fund
  • Funding Lending Scheme
  • Deregulating some planning rules
  • Frozen Council Tax

Of course, the beauty of this resource is that you can change any of these policies to whatever you want them to be.

Click on this link to download the Angry Economist 2.

PS.  Click on this link to have a look at the original Angry Economist.

Paul Ormerod: Whatever happened to all those miners?  Shocks and economic resilience

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Where have all the miners gone?  To judge by the rhetoric of the BBC and other Leftist media outlets, whole swathes of Britain lie devastated, plagued by rickets, unemployment and endemic poverty – nearly thirty years after the pit closures under Lady Thatcher!

The reality is different.  There is indeed a small number of local authority areas where employment has never really recovered from the closures in the 1980s.  But, equally, there are former mining areas which have prospered.  


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Unit 4 Macro: Migration flows across the world

Sunday, April 14, 2013

Fantastic interactive website here lets you check out migration flows both inward and outward from any country you care to look at.

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Unit 2 and Unit 4 Macro: Economic Simulation - the Government Game

Introducing The Government Game - tutor2u's new Economic Simulation game that is just perfect for revising for AS & A2 Macroeconomic Policy topics!

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Unit 4 Macro: Language Proficiency and Labour Mobility in Europe

Friday, April 12, 2013

Increasing foreign language proficiency could be a key policy tool for encouraging greater mobility of labour between countries of the European Union and reducing the huge differences in rates of youth unemployment. According to research by Professors Ainhoa Aparicio-Fenoll and Zoe
Kuehn, including foreign language studies in the compulsory school curriculum fosters migration across European countries.

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Unit 2 Macro: Wealth of Nations and Human Capital

Monday, April 08, 2013

A recent World Bank report asked ‘Where is the Wealth of Nations?’ Calculations presented at the Economic History Society’s 2013 annual conference show that for Britain, the answer is undoubtedly in its people.

Dr Jan Kunnas and his colleagues calculate that Britain’s ‘human capital’ has grown by a multiple of 123 over the past 250 years. The main drivers of this phenomenal growth have been the growth in the workforce and the growth in wages.

The researchers define human capital as the knowledge and skills embodied in individuals – and they measure it by the discounted earnings the population is expected to earn during their time in the labour force.

We have an extended revision note on human capital and economic growth - read it here

The Changing Wealth of Nations - World Bank reports can be accessed here


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Unit 4 Macro: Getting Back to Growth - Lessons from the 1930s


How Britain escaped from the travails of the Great Depression and achieved 4% a year growth in the years from 1933 to 1937 has important lessons for today’s policy-makers, according to research by Professor Nicholas Crafts, presented at the Economic History Society’s 2013 annual conference. 

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Unit 2 Macro: The Great Productivity Puzzle

Friday, April 05, 2013

GDP per hour – labour productivity – in the UK remains lower than at the beginning of the recession in 2008. A special session at the Royal Economic Society on Friday 5 April held jointly by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) and Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) investigated the causes of this mystery. It was also the subject of BBC Rradio 4 In Business - click here

See also: the Job Rich Depression (The Economist)

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Unit 3 Micro: Minimum Wage and Inequality

Thursday, April 04, 2013

The UK national minimum wage (NMW) has been in the news in recent days with several reports suggesting that Coalition government ministers are considering introducing a freeze on the pay floor or going further and reducing the minimum hourly pay rate. The NMW was introduced into the UK in the spring of 1999 and has been up-rated regularly but never cut. It is presently at £6.19 an hour and recommendations on changes to the pay floor come from the annual review conducted by the Low Pay Commission

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Unit 4 Macro: Unemployment in Germany - The Hartz Reforms

Germany’s low unemployment is in large part due to the ‘Hartz Reforms’, which started as early as 2003 and have reduced the long-run rate of unemployment by 1.1%. That is the central finding of research by Matthias Hertweck and Oliver Sigrist, to be presented at the Royal Economic Society’s 2013 annual conference.

Unemployment rates across much of Europe have surged to unprecedented levels in recent years, particularly among the southern countries. In contrast, German unemployment has continued to fall even during the Great Recession. The authors conclude:

‘Our results build a solid basis for the macroeconomic effectiveness of such labour market reforms. This is particularly important for policy-makers across Europe who are currently planning to undertake similar structural reforms.’

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Unit 4 Macro: Unemployment in Europe (March 2013 Update)

Tuesday, April 02, 2013


The scale and depth of the unemployment crisis in Europe is confirmed by fresh figures released by Euro Stat. Unemployment in the Euro Zone was 12.0% in February 2013 and the jobless rate for the European Union as a whole was 10.9%. Last month there were 26.3 million people counted as out of work in the twenty-seven countries within the single market, 19 million of whom live in Euro Zone countries. In the last year alone, unemployment in the Euro Zone has jumped by over 1.7 million but this aggregate figure hides large country differences and persistent regional and local variations. Here is the contextual data to take into the exam:

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Unit 2 Macro: Fresh Serving of Acronym Soup - ZIRPs and PLOGs

Economic commentators love their acronyms and abbreviations - they come in handy when reaching character capacity limits on a tweet and also for students fighting the exam clock to complete a timed essay. Two new ones have come to my attention in recent days. What does ZIRP and PLOG mean to you?

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Revision Quiz: AS Economics: Unemployment (1)

Monday, April 01, 2013

This 10-question revision quiz focuses on unemployment.

Launch Revision Quiz: AS Economics: Unemployment (1)

Is this the start of Plan B?

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

It’s not often you read such a clearly set out, even-handed article on macroeconomic policy, so this relatively lengthy piece was interesting in itself as its writer appears to deal relatively equally with both sides of the big austerity debate. But you really have to take notice when the writer is the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, Vince Cable.

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Unit 4 Macro: A Manifesto for Growth - the LSE Growth Commission Report

Thursday, January 31, 2013

On Thursday 31st of January 2013, the long-awaited LSE Growth Commission Report was published and launched in London. The document itself is available for download from this link and I urge all teachers and students interested in growth, competitiveness and the fairness agenda to have a look at it. It is full of rewarding and important insights into the drivers of balanced growth in a modern advanced economy.

I will be adding new resources and links to this blog following the launch event

Key Points from LSE Growth Report

Existing Strengths

  1. Strong rule of law
  2. Generally competitive product markets
  3. Flexible labour market
  4. A world-class university system
  5. Openness to foreign investors and migrants
  6. Independent regulators including competition authorities
  7. Strengths in many key sectors including high end manufacturing

LSE Commission Growth Agenda

Education

  • Greater autonomy for schools, tackle the long tail of under-performance. Conditional cash transfers for families to pupil attendance and performance. Focus league tables less on % attaining 5 A-C grades. Reveal performance at the bottom end.
  • Concentrating on skills (improving human capital) gives people the resilience to recover from global shifts in the division of labour

Infrastructure

  • Critical infrastructure essential for competitiveness in modern economy. For the UK, transport and energy are infrastructure areas with biggest issues; there has been a lack of clear strategy and lots of dithering / political delays. 
  • Huge opportunities for UK - industrial revolution driven by search for low-carbon technologies driving innovation - can the UK keep up?

LSE Commission proposes: 

  • 1) Strategy Board (for planning)
  • 2) Planning Commission (for delivery) 
  • 3) Infrastructure Bank (for funding)

Innovation

  • Innovation is the third channel for increased growth
  • Problems in UK capital markets mean innovation is not properly funded - short-termism remains a structural weakness of the markets

Banking/ Finance

  • More competition in retail banking
  • Business bank that prioritises lending to SMEs and innovative firms

Changing the compass of economic performance

  • Commission suggests that focus on GDP is not helpful
  • GDP misses out on who gets the growth and measures production not income 
  • Need more focus on Median Household Income
  • Median household income and GDP per capita have been decoupled since about 2002. GDP no longer tracks it

Overall

UK trend growth rate can be lifted by 0.5% with effective structural reforms - large compound effect on incomes over the long run

Institutions and incentives matter for growth. Macro stability important too. UK politics too short term and adversarial. Fundamental weakness is the failure to create a stable policy framework.

More focus needed on evidence based policy making to make government smarter.

Here  Professor John Van Reenen, Director of CEP and co-chair of the LSE Growth Commission, presents a 'manifesto for growth' for the UK economy over the next 50 years, backed up by the Growth Commission's report. 

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Unit 4 Macro: The Failure of Austerity

Saturday, January 05, 2013

Here is a selection of links and news videos on the vexed economic, social and political issue of fiscal austerity - there is a particular focus on the effects of austerity in the debt-ridden crisis countries of the Euro Zone

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Unit 2 Macro: Key Term Glossary

Friday, January 04, 2013

An updated glossary of key terms for AS macro

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Prospects for the UK Economy in 2013

Wednesday, January 02, 2013

As the sun rises on another year will the headwinds be favourable for Britain or are we facing up to another year of stresses and strains? Here is a brief commentary and overview of some of the key macroeconomic data for the UK economy together with some links to external articles and videos on economic prospects for Britain as we head in 2013.

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Unit 4 Macro: Student visa restrictions may curb growth and innovation

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Any visa policies that restrict entry by highly productive foreign students are a significant barrier to science and ultimately to innovation and growth. That is one of the conclusions of research by Professors Eric Stuen, Mushfiq Mobarak and Keith Maskus, published in the latest issue of the Economic Journal.

Their study of 700,000 postgraduates in the science and engineering laboratories of the top US universities finds that American students and foreign students are both highly significant contributors to the development of scientific knowledge. But greater diversity in the origins of foreign students raises their joint contribution to knowledge.

These findings imply that visa restrictions limiting the entry of high- ability foreign students – as well as visa policies that prioritise students’ ability to pay tuition fees over their technical merits – would significantly undermine scientific output.


Unit 2 Macro: Unemployment in a Recession

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Here is a film of the Royal Economic Society's annual public lecture 2012 by Nobel laureate Professor Chris Pissarides 

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Workplace Discrimination

Friday, December 07, 2012


Employment Rate Employment Rate Unemployment Rate Unemployment Rate Inactivity Rate Inactivity Rate

MEN WOMEN MEN WOMEN MEN WOMEN
White  76.6% 67.6% 8.3% 6.8% 16.4% 27.5%
Mixed or Multiple  64.3% 55.3% 15.7% 15.8% 23.7% 34.3%
Black 61.4% 55.6% 21.7% 17.7% 21.6% 32.4%
Indian  77.0% 60.6% 8.2% 11.1% 16.2% 31.9%
Pakistani/Bangladeshi 68.7% 28.9% 12.8% 20.5% 21.3% 63.6%
Chinese & Other 67.0% 51.8% 10.3% 10.6% 25.3% 42.1%
Ethnic Minority 68.2% 50.8% 13.2% 14.3% 21.5% 40.8%
All 75.6% 65.6% 8.9% 7.5% 17.0% 29.1%
Source:  Labour Force Survey 2011

If you have seen the news stories today showing how workplace discrimination towards ethnic minority women continues to cause the government concern, you may be interested to read the full report.   It is available from the Runnymede Trust (it requires registration but it is free) and has been written for the All Party Parliamentary Group on Race and Community.  There's a brief summary from the BBC, but the full report gives recommendations that you might like to present to students as possible government intervention strategies and get them to evaluate accordingly.  The table above gives you a flavour of the statistics that can be used to discuss inequality of income and wealth.

Unit 2 Macro: Underemployment in the UK Economy

Saturday, December 01, 2012

The Office of National Statistics published some important data this week on the state of the UK labour market as the economy struggles to sustain a decent recovery. They released information showing that the number of underemployed workers i.e. those who want to work more hours, has risen by an estimated 1 million (or 47.3%) since the start of the economic downturn in 2008 to stand at 3.05 million in 2012. Nearly two thirds of the 1 million increase took place in the 12 months between 2008 and 2009, when the economy was in recession.


From 2000 to just before the 2008/09 recession the number of people underemployed was relatively steady and since 2009 the number has been rising, although at a much slower rate than during the recession.

We thank Hannah Thomas from the ONS who has provided us with this superb info-graphic on under-employment

Underemployed_Workers_Graphic.pdf 

This will make for a terrific teaching resource in the classroom and help to deepen student understanding of differences between unemployment and under-employment.


 

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Nobel Winner address youth unemployment

Thursday, November 22, 2012

Youth unemployment is higher than adult unemployment even in normal economic times. But in recessions, especially in countries with rigid labour markets, young people typically stay unemployed for too long. In these circumstances, urgent policy action is needed to avoid long-term unemployment, which destroys talent and creates social problems.

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Unit 2 Macro: Unemployment Rises as Hovis Factory Closes

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Premier Foods is the UK's largest food manufacturer but in November 2012 they have announced the closure of two large bakeries that have - for many years - produced Hovis bread for supermarkets. The closure of the factories follows the loss of its £75m-a-year contract with Co-operative supermarkets. Hundreds of jobs are set to be lost in the spring of 2013 with damaging consequences for the local economy. What types of unemployment can you associate with these factory closures? What measures might be appropriate in addressing the extra unemployment problem that will result?

BBC news: Hovis shuts bakeries - click here

Hovis bakery worker devastated - click here

Unit 2 Macro: Revision Resources on Inflation and Unemployment

Sunday, November 18, 2012

Here are collections of regularly updated resources on two key AS macro topics, inflation and unemployment


The Big Issue of Poverty in the UK

Tuesday, October 02, 2012

This article in the BBC  about the 21st anniversary of the launch of the Big Issue newspaper acts as a timely reminder that we can find our very own examples of absolute as well as relative poverty in the UK.

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Unit 2 Macro: Record(ing) Unemployment

Monday, October 01, 2012

As unemployment hits the headlines for the wrong reasons again : ‘The Eurozone is heading for disaster’.... ‘the lost generation’.... it is a great opportunity to study the theoretical concepts in this area. Unemployment in the eurozone hit a fresh high of 18.2 million in August; the highest unemployment rate was recorded in Spain, where 25.1% of the workforce is out of a job! Youth unemployment remains a particular concern, with the rate among under-25s hitting 22.8% across the eurozone and data from Eurostat shows that 55.4% of adults under 25 are out of work in Greece, compared to 52.9% in Spain! 

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60 Second Adventures in Economics - The Phillips Curve

Thursday, September 20, 2012

In this 60 second summary, David Mitchell explains that Bill Phillips' curve historically described an inverse relationship between the rate of unemployment and the rate of wage (and therefore price) inflation - but since his analysis became popular the relationship has changed.

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Unit 2 Macro: Youth Unemployment and Startup Milk Rounds

Thursday, July 19, 2012

This Financial Times news video is excellent on issues surrounding high rates of youth unemployment. The number of 18- to 24-year-olds out of work for at least six months has risen by more than a third in the past year to 403,000.

Many thousands are struggling to find work and the lack of apprenticeship schemes and the high level of short term or vulnerable contract work makes it extremely tough to get into formal work. More and more students are looking to establish their own businesses as an alternative. The rapid expansion of student-led entrepreneurship societies based around colleges and universities is a welcome development. So too is the rise of “start-up” milk-rounds at many of the UK’s universities. Challenging times yes, but opportunities will always exist for enquiring minds with ideas to incubate and grow.

BBC News: Unemployment down to 2.6m but long-term jobless rises

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Unit 2 Macro: Evaluation on Supply-Side Policies

Monday, May 21, 2012

Lots of students will be revising the economics of supply-side policies this week with their AS macro paper coming into view. There are different interpretations of what constitutes a supply-side policy measure. I like to label SSP (supply-side policy) to any policy or group of measures where emphasis is given to improving the working of markets, raising factor efficiency, improving the quantity and quality of labour and in lifting the capacity and competitiveness of an economy in a constantly-changing international environment.

Many supply side policies focus on improving incentives and outcomes in the labour market, others are geared towards bettering the performance of markets for goods and services, All of them centre on helping to sustain non-inflationary growth, improve trade performance, lift living standards and create new and fulfilling jobs opportunities.

This revision blog looks in particular at some evaluation points on supply-side approaches:

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Unit 2 Macro: Migration and the UK Economy

Sunday, May 20, 2012

A revision blog on the economic impact of migration on the UK economy

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Unit 2 Macro: Positive and Negative Multiplier Effects

An initial change in aggregate demand can have a much greater final impact on equilibrium national income. This is known as the multiplier effect. It comes about because injections of new demand for goods and services into the circular flow of income can stimulate further rounds of spending – in other words “one person’s spending is another’s income”. Put another way, spending becomes someone else’s income. This can lead to a bigger eventual effect on output and employment.

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Unit 2 Macro: Measuring Unemployment in the UK

The unemployed are people able, available and willing to work at the going wage rate but cannot find a job despite an active search for work.

Unemployment means that scarce human resources are not being used to produce goods and services to meet people’s needs and wants. Persistently high levels of joblessness have damaging consequences for an economy causing both economic and social costs.

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Unit 2 Macro: The Output Gap

How much spare capacity does an economy have to meet a rise in demand? How close is an economy to operating at its productive potential? Has the recession damaged the economy’s productive potential? These sorts of questions all link to an important concept – the output gap. The output gap is the difference between the actual level of national output and the estimated potential level and is usually expressed as a percentage of the level of potential output.

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Revision notes on unemployment

A revision blog on possible unemployment questions on AS and A2 papers

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Made in China - but not quite so cheaply…...

Tuesday, May 08, 2012

How long can China keep its comparative advantage of cheap production for manufacturing goods? We are aware of rising inflation in China which is eroding their advantage, and here is an article about a UK firm which manufactures cushions, some from a factory in Kirkby on Merseyside and some from his factory in the Zhejiang province in China. The story comes from a programme ‘The Town taking on China’ to be shown on BBC2 at 8pm tonight - and subsequently on i-player.

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Unit 2 Macro: Unemployment Glossary

Saturday, May 05, 2012

A selection of key terms linked to the topic of unemployment

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Prospects for the UK economy, in brief

Friday, May 04, 2012

The NIESR has published its latest ‘Prospects for the UK economy’ this morning - this link given is to the one-page press release. This clear document gives some stark headlines from their predictions: they consider the persistent weakness in the economy to be unprecedented, they continue to expect that CPI will fall below target by the end of the year, and they believe that unemployment will rise to 9% and stay there for some years, doing permanent damage to the supply side of the UK economy. They estimate that a 1 per cent of GDP increase in government investment this year would boost GDP by around 0.7 per cent, and would provide a boost to the short-run lack of aggregate demand. They do predict a return to growth in 2013, with some above-average growth figures for 2014, which may return the economy to its size of 2008. For the sake of the students sitting their AS and A levels in the next few weeks, let us hope that they are right.

Unit 4 Macro: Spanish unemployed head to Argentina

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Catastrophically high unemployment in countries such as Spain are causing people to leave the Med in search of work elsewhere and thousands are trying their luck in South America. This short video from Al Jazeerah news looks at the growing number of people heading to Argentina looking for a job or perhaps the chance to start a new business. Watching it is a chance to revise some of the factors that affect the geographical mobility of labour? This Economist report looks at some of the causes of geographical immobility of labour.

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Unit 1 Micro: End of the Road for the Lada

Boasting a steering wheel that doesn’t steer, an in car radio that is an optional extra and acceleration powers that - on a good day - can take you from 0 to 60 in less than three minutes, the Lada has for a long time been a figure of fun in global motoring circles. But production is coming to an end following a collapse in sales. As is often the case, news of the demise of the Lada has prompted increased interest among younger urban consumers whose DNA is to go against the grain and drive something that is sturdy, mercifully free of corporate design features and most of all, tremendously cheap.

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Unit 2 Macro: Better news on jobs in the UK?

Thursday, April 19, 2012

This excellent news video from Channel 4 news looks at the changing pattern of employment in the UK economy. The number of full time workers is dropping and there has been a big switch towards part-time employment. Who are the winners and losers in our labour market as the fragile recovery struggles to maintain momentum?

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Unit 2 Macro: Skills Shortages Hold Back Recovery

Thursday, April 12, 2012

Here is a superb news report from Channel 4 news about the shortage of skilled workers in the North East of England (an area of high unemployment). Nissan this week announced a big new investment in car making at their ultra-high productivity plant in Washington, Tyne and Wear. But many of the manufacturers along Nissan’s supply chain are finding it tough to get enough skilled people coming througth to make realistic bid for the orders that will come from Nissa. Some businesses are having to turn down contracts because they dont have the extra workforce to cope with the higher volumes of businesses.

Skills shortages are restricting the growth of many small and medium sized businesses especially in manufacturing. Little wonder that Nissan is working very closely with Gateshead College to run an apprenticeship scheme - an example of external economies of scale in action.

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Superb article on unemployment

Sunday, April 08, 2012

Here is a superbly clear and relevant article on the Channel 4 news blog from Jonathan Portes, head of thr NIESR - it focuses on the unemployment problem facing the UK economy and outlines some policy options for cutting the jobless total. Superb for both AS and A2 macro students.

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